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Research

New research

Weight Gain in Oncology Patients Using a Plant-Based Oral Nutrition Supplement 1

Authors: Melissa Bailey, Vanessa Millovich, Shayna Komar

Research shows that 49-74% of oncology patients will experience unintentional weight loss at some point during their treatment.2 As research on the use of plant-based enteral formulas (PBEF) and their efficacy in oncology is limited, we looked at the use of PBEF in the adult oncology patient population, and its effect on weight.

Oncology patients consuming Kate Farms:

100% of oncology patients maintained or gained weight while on Kate Farms.3

1 Bailey, M., Millovich, V., Komar, S. Weight gain in oncology patients using a plant-based oral nutrition supplement. Poster accepted for presentation at: Virtual Congress on Clinical Nutrition & Metabolism; September 2020.
2 Dufau L (2010) Prevalence of malnutrition in cancer patients. Diaeta 28, 31–36.
3 n=13. Due to Covid-19, only 9 patients were able to return for follow-up visits.

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Improved GI Tolerance and Weight Gain in Pediatric Patients using Plant‑Based Enteral Formulas

Authors: Stanley Cohen, MD; Ana Ramirez, MD; Vanessa Millovich, DCN, RDN, LDN

Abstract accepted by the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) and published in the March 2020 digital supplement of the Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (JPEN).
In this study, researchers at a pediatric GI clinic reviewed the charts of patients who had switched from their previous formula to Kate Farms within the previous 2 years. Tolerance questionnaires were completed by the parents of the study participants.

Patients who switched to Kate Farms had improved weight gain and tolerance outcomes.

86% of patients had improved weight-for-age z-scores.2
90% of parents reported better tolerance on Kate Farms compared to their child’s previous formula.3

This is the first study to demonstrate efficacy and tolerance of plant-based enteral formulas in a pediatric population.

1 Cohen, SA., et al. Improved GI tolerance and weight gain in pediatric patients using plant-based enteral formulas. JPEN. 2020; 44(3):274.
2 For those patients <21 years old with a documented weight-for-age z-score (n=7), Six showed improvement.
3 Tolerance questionnaires were completed for 10 patients: 90% of caregivers agreed that their child tolerated the plant-based formula better than their previous regimen.

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Patient-Reported Outcomes Indicate Plant‑Based Enteral Formula Improves Nutrition and Gastrointestinal Symptoms

Authors: Stanley Cohen, MD; Ana Ramirez, MD; Vanessa Millovich, DCN, RDN, LDN

Abstract accepted by the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) and published in the March 2020 digital supplement of the Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (JPEN).
This study investigated patient-reported outcomes of pediatric and adult users of plant-based enteral formulas containing intact or hydrolyzed pea protein. A total of 392 patients and caregivers completed the online survey.

Patients who switched to Kate Farms reported:

  • 67% improved digestive symptoms, including easier bowel movements; less reflux, abdominal discomfort, bloating, and nausea.
  • 79% feeling healthier.2
  • 86% weight gain or maintenance.3
  • 89% improved nutrition.

1 Cohen, SA., et al. Patient-reported outcomes indicate plant-based enteral formula improves nutrition and gastrointestinal symptoms. JPEN. 2020; 44(3):275.
279% of respondents reported that they strongly agreed/agreed that they felt healthier while on Kate Farms.
3 Of total respondents (n=392), 58.4% reported weight gain and 27.8% reported no change in weight.

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Plant-based Enteral Nutrition Tolerance and Benefit in Pediatric Crohn’s Disease: A Case Series

Authors: Daniel Orellana, MD; Natasha Avila, RD; Melissa Bailey, MS, RD, CNSC, LDN; Karla Au Yeung, MD

Abstract accepted by the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) and published in the March 2020 digital supplement of the Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (JPEN).

The purpose of this study was to assess the outcomes of three pediatric Crohn’s disease patients in clinical remission who were started on pediatric peptide plant-based enteral nutrition (PPBEN) in conjunction with Crohn’s disease exclusion diet (CDED). Questionnaires were conducted, labs were analyzed, and anthropometrics were measured.

Pediatric patients with Crohn’s disease who switched2 to Kate Farms had:

  • Weight gain and Increased BMI z-scores.3
  • Improved tolerance and adherence.4

1 Orellana, D., et al. Plant-based enteral nutrition tolerance and benefit in pediatric Crohn’s disease: A case series. JPEN. 2020; 44(3):190-191.
2Patients were either taking casein-based pediatric peptide or elemental formula before trial of plant-based enteral nutrition.
3All patients in the case series had weight gain and improved BMI z-scores.
4All patients experienced less bloating, gas, fullness, and less gastroesophageal reflux; all patients received the prescribed volume more routinely.

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Plant-Based Peptide Enteral Nutrition with Phytonutrients in a Pediatric Patient Status Post Bone Marrow Transplant: A Case Report

Authors: Melissa Bailey, MS, RD, CNSC, LDN; Kelsey Bullard, MS, RD; Vanessa Millovich, DCN, RDN, LDN

Abstract accepted by the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) and published in the March 2020 digital supplement of the Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (JPEN).
The purpose of this study was to document the successful concomitant use of a plant-based, phytonutrient-containing enteral formula and immunosuppressive medications. A 3-year-old male with a history of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and status post Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) was transitioned to a plant-based pediatric peptide enteral formula. Weight and tolerance were monitored.

A pediatric bone marrow transplant patient who switched2 to Kate Farms had:

  • Resolved symptoms of GI intolerance3
  • Weight gain
  • No reported medication interactions4

1 Bailey, M., et al. Plant-based peptide enteral nutrition with phytonutrients in a pediatric patient status post bone marrow transplant: A case report. JPEN. 2020; 44(3):226-227.
2Previous formulas included standard dairy-based infant formula, hypoallergenic infant and junior formulas, partially hydrolyzed dairy-based pediatric formula with soluble fiber.
3Resolved symptoms of GI intolerance included nausea, vomiting, large/loose stools, bloody stools.
4No documentation of the phytonutrient blend interfering with any of the anti-rejection medications was noted.

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Usage Patterns and Clinician-Reported Outcomes of Patients Using a Plant‑Based, Organic, Calorically Dense Peptide Formula

Authors: Vanessa Carr MS, RDN, LDN, DCNc

A study on the usage and outcomes of pediatric and adult patients with a medical need for nutritional formula who had been prescribed a plant-based, organic, calorically dense peptide formula (Kate Farms® Peptide 1.5). Based on clinician-reported outcomes, patients using the formula experienced positive outcomes.

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